The labor market

DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION?

Will human labor become unnecessary because of robots? Will digitalization lead to the loss of jobs? Will professional communication from now on always be done through digital tools? How can we promote health and combat illness with the help of digitalization?

The labor market is evolving at lightning speed. The way in which services and products are delivered is undergoing enormous changes. The exact impact of these dynamics is still difficult to measure precisely. The skills and abilities that are required today to operate in the labor market will no longer be so tomorrow.

The predictions about the evolution of jobs give perspective on the future but are not definitive. Every individual can help shape the evolution by making intrinsic interests and talents relevant on the labor market and thus increasing the human input. Crucial in the digitization process is that every actor in society, companies, workers, citizens, governments, and organizations, can reap the benefits that this process brings. The offering of perspective by governments and social partners creates the conditions for a smooth transition to a digital society and economy where more prosperity, inclusion and sustainability is guaranteed.

Offering perspective to yourself, to your loved ones, to your communities and integrating perspective in policy is hugely important to transform uncertain feelings into determination and ambition. A first step is always to gather information, followed by self-reflection about your own role. The digital (r)evolution will require an adaptive capacity from humans to let go of the known and to take new paths with one goal: a more prosperous, inclusive, and efficient world.

DIGITAL EVOLUTION

It is tempting to reach for simple definitions of digitality, but to operate meaningfully and sustainably, digital needs to be seen less as a thing and more as a way of doing things. In times of big data and the increasingly important artificial intelligence, digitization profoundly changes every aspect of the living environment, such as the way work, education, relationships, finances and living conditions are known.

The increasing use of information, communication and derived technologies (robotics, AI, nanotechnology, machine learning, big data analysis, etc.) by individuals, companies and governments has a significant impact on economic, ecological, political and socio-cultural developments.

The labor market is characterized by the beginning of an era where manpower is no longer the measure, but intellectual labor is the norm. Therefore, the difference in natural bodies is no longer a justifiable reason for gendered relationships in the labor market.

 

Digital/technological innovation gives both the individual and the collective the opportunity to reinvent themselves, eliminate rigid (gender) structures, and redefine gender roles as no longer determinative in the future labor market. Digitalization implies promising prospects, but also disruption of the labor market. Technological progress can no longer be stopped, but the possibility to let it flow out of a child society is there.

Digital evolution consists of unlocking growth. How you interpret and act upon the definition of digitality can vary, but it is important to understand what it means for your individual life, the business world, and the societal interest at large. Creating a shared vision around how to integrate the digital story into actions and thoughts is an important step in creating added value.

Digital evolution consists of unlocking growth. How you interpret and act upon the definition of digitality can vary, but it is important to understand what it means for your individual life, the business world, and the societal interest at large. Creating a shared vision around how to integrate the digital story into actions and thoughts is an important step in creating added value.

 

Examples of 'new' jobs: Data scientist, Work Happiness Expert, Domotics/ Smart Home/ IoT expert, Growth Hacker, Digital Developer, Longevity Coach, Product Owner, Development Coach, Drone pilot, 3D specialist, Logistics specialist, Professional Organizer, Empathetic care and welfare professional, Nan-medicine, cultural skills advisor, Skypet-rainer, Web development teacher, Ethical Hacker, Sustainable building/ green builder, Finance Coach, Facilitator, Virtual Assistant, Human-Computer Interaction Designer, ...

“It’s not easy, this world of change. It means you have to change too. And looking at all that digitalisation may be replacing your job or your colleague’s job, kinda sucks. But the reality is that if you don’t change, you will be forced eventually, because the moment your customer has an alternative that relieves the pain even more or solves it completely, he’s gone. And so is your business. So if you look at your service, what is the part that really matters? The expertise, the trust,… that is where you need the human contact. All other things are up for change.” - Dewi Van De Vyver, Flow Pilots.
The majority of children who start elementary school today will later have a job that does not yet exist today. Children and young people need to be aware of a constantly changing future. The jobs that their parents are in today may not exist in 15 years.

Educating children to become critical impact makers is a priority in a changing world, this by encouraging them to look for social challenges themselves and to reflect on them in a solution-oriented way towards the future.

Gender balance in the digitization of the labor market

The European labor market is still too often characterized by a division of jobs based on gender. This implies the non-utilization of potential talent, unfulfilled aspirations and missed opportunities for women, men, and society at large. In all EU member states, men still dominate specific sectors such as engineering and technology but are absent from areas such as education and healthcare. The absence of women in tech sectors is blamed by male tech leaders on a difference in biological origins. Nothing could be further from the truth. A climate of systematic gender bias, a cycle of men funding men, and a corporate culture that excludes women are at the heart of the problem.
Using the designation automation ‘trends’ instead of ‘risks’ is a conscious choice. 'Automation risks' has a negative connotation and this is not necessarily so. The term risk represents a potential danger that may result in an actual incident resulting in injury and damage. If automation risks are viewed as a matter of an undesirable event, the opportunities created by a changing labor market are ignored.

About gender

The concept of gender should be clearly understood as a socio-cultural, transversal, and overarching variable. Gender is a mechanism that cannot be known merely by perceiving the observable.

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